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D-Link has announced new 802.11ax Ultra Wi-Fi Routers

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CES is here in Las Vegas, NV, and like every year, it is an annual schmorgesborg of new tech to dive into and play with. Filled with the world’s greatest tech companies as they show off all of the latest products and technology they have been working hard on.

D-Link is one of these many (many) companies attending CES with a number of new products, including a now newly announced set of 802.11ax Ultra Wi-Fi Routers. The includes the AX6000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router (DIR-X6060) and the AX11000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router (DIR-X9000), both of which claim to be able to blow Wireless 802.11ac technology away. Like the (also) new 802.11ad we have spoken about recently (ie, Netgear AD7200 router), these new wireless technologies focus on delivering a much higher max throughput for networks, allowing you to multitask like never before, and load your network up with all of the wonderful smart devices that continue to flood the market.

Where 802.11ad networks offer amazing speeds at a shorter distance, 802.11ax seeks to take the place of 802.11ac, by delivering similar speeds but with the focus of being able to cover longer distances and stability for multiple devices all at once, using MU-MIMO technology (multi-user multiple input-multiple output).

As the D-Link model names suggest, these new routers will reach max throughput speeds of up to 6,000 Mbps and 11,000 Mbps (combined between all broadcasted networks). They include a 2.5 Gbps WAN port (the LAN ports are still 1 Gbps), 4×4 MU-MIMO, 8 antennas to deliver maximum range with, USB 3.0 for connected drives, DLNA support and app access from a mobile device.

These routers won’t be available for purchase just yet though. You will have to wait till the second half of this year (2018) before you can get your hands on one. So for now, if you are in dire need of a router that conquers the rest, you might want to give Netgear (here) or TP-Link’s (here) AD7200 router a try! Else, if you can wait, then 802.11ax might be worth holding out for.

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Tracy

Tracy comes with a background in computer science and engineering. She has a vast knowledge of consumer electronics, an avid RC/drone hobbyist and has been benchmarking both electronics and applications since 16 years of age. She has authored 3 personal blogs since 1999 and written for ProAudio magazine. The best way to win her heart, is a box of german truffles.

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